One Night In A WigWam

Camping. I absolutely love camping. I remember in Summertime when I was little my Dad used to help me and my little sister put a two-man tent up in the […]

Thaikhun Menu Review

I’ve been looking forward to today for weeks, since I was asked by the guys at Thaikhun in the Metrocentre if I’d like to visit with my family to try […]

Out of Date Mates Review

Weaning. It only feels like five minutes ago we were here with Little V and we’ve recently started the weaning journey all over again with our second baby B. I’ve […]

How can we help our children to learn about sharing?  This post was carefully selected by me, and is delivered to you via WILF Books , a sharing-­based,  children’s book delivery service.    ­­ Sharing is a super vital life skill, isn’t it? It teaches us how to co-operate with one another in our  everyday lives. It teaches us about compromise, that if we give just a little to others, we can also get  a little of what what we’d like too. It teaches us about negotiation, and how to cope with  disappointment. It’s a fundamental human value that makes us who we are.    We all recognise its importance, but how can we help our children to learn about sharing?   Well, first and foremost, we think it starts with you. Monkey see, monkey do. Children learn so much  just from watching what their parents do.  You’re their role model, and when you model good sharing  and *taking turns* in your family, it gives children a really great example to follow. You, as a parent,  can always facilitate and encourage sharing in everyday life, and here are five simple ways through  which to do that: ● Allow them to see it in others: Recognise it when your child sees another child sharing.  There’s nothing more beautiful (and cute!) than watching children share and play nicely  together, a little bit like grown­ups do. You can say things like: ‘Woah, wasn’t your friend  sharing her toys really well, that was really lovely of her.” ● Nurture it through play: It’s really fun to play little exercises with your child that involve  turn­taking, sharing and inclusive participation. Talk your child step by step through the  process of sharing, saying things like, ‘It’s your turn, then it’s my turn; you share the brown  bricks with me, and I’ll share the pink bricks with you, I’ll play with Buzz whilst you play with  Woody”. […]